Article: What to Think About When Considering Donating Your Eggs

What to Think About When Considering Donating Your Eggs
By Diane Tober | Rewire | March 16, 2017

Egg donation can bring joy to other people, but it is not a process to enter into lightly. There are children being created that one day may want to know you. Your perspective may change over time. And it is a medical procedure that includes putting large dosages of hormones into your body that may affect your health or future fertility.

This article by Dr. Diane Tober is a must-read, especially for people contemplating becoming egg providers. It describes the nuts and bolts of the process and all the risks along the way. It offers suggestions to improve outcomes, featuring data gathered from egg providers that have participated in Tober’s ongoing research on their decisions and experiences.

Read the full article >

Dr. Tober has conducted extensive research in topics related to bioethics, reproductive technologies, and commodification of the body. For more on her work and writing, visit the website of the Center for Genetics and Society.

Article: Why You Should Know About IVF’s Potentially Fatal Side Effects

Why You Should Know About IVF’s Potentially Fatal Side Effects
By Ila Ananya | The Wire | March 21, 2017

This article follows the story of Arathi Krishnan Chhetri, a 34-year-old woman who sought help from a well-known IVF clinic in the Indian state of Bangalore. It provides painstaking details on her interaction with clinic providers, highlighting the lack of transparency and inept or lackadaisical care that have come to define fertility treatment in many situations. Through Chhetri’s experience with Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome, which landed her in the Intensive Care Unit, the author guides readers through possible symptoms and cautions on current practices in IVF.

Read the full article >

Article: Women Fear Drug They Used to Halt Puberty Led to Health Problems

Women Fear Drug They Used to Halt Puberty Led to Health Problems
By Christine Jewett | Kaiser Health News | Feb. 2, 2017

Lupron is most often linked to egg retrieval. (See Egg Providers and other articles in this section, such as Diane Tober’s piece on Rewire, for more information.)

Few people might be aware of Lupron’s use to treat central precocious puberty (PP) or growth issues in young children. Kaiser Health News and Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting track the effects of the drug on adults exposed to it as children, to treat PP. The article follows Sharissa Derricott, now 30 years and living in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and others who have suffered a laundry list of physical and emotional problems as a result.

Read the full article > 

In a related piece by Lynne Millican, people are invited to share their own experiences with Lupron. Learn more about Lynne’s personal journey on Impact Ethics and visit her website.

Article: Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome – It’s Time to Reverse the Trend

Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome – It’s Time to Reverse the Trend
By Dr. Geeta Nargund | BioNews | Dec. 5, 2016

screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-2-58-45-pmIn this commentary, Dr. Geeta Nargund at CREATE Fertility, discusses the increase in ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) reported by fertility clinics in the United Kingdom.

In the author’s opinion, a report published by the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) “obfuscates” real data – a 40 percent rise in hospital admissions with severe OHSS. She suggests the HFEA prioritize this “alarming statistic” and focus on reversing the trend, offering the following recommendations: a reduced dose of stimulation followed by GnRH agonist to trigger ovulation, with an option of cryopreservation of all embryos; and abandoning the use of the “long downregulation” protocol, employed in many IVF treatment cycles, and a switch to antagonist cycles.

In line with others in the field, Nargund also emphasizes the need for informed consent – placing the responsibility for this on providers – and rigorous documentation of the effects of stimulation protocols (including the drugs and dosages used).

Read the full commentary >

Report: Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report

Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | October 2016

cdc-2016-art-reportThe data for this report come from the 458 U.S. fertility clinics in operation in 2014. It is organized into the following sections.

  • Section 1: Information on the different types of ART cycles performed in 2014.
  • Section 2: Information on ART cycles that used only fresh non-donor eggs or embryos.
  • Section 3: Information on the ART cycles that used only frozen non-donor embryos.
  • Section 4: Information on the ART cycles that used only donated eggs or embryos.
  • Section 5: Information on trends in the number of ART procedures and measures of success over the past 10 years, from 2005 through 2014.

Read the full report >

Report: Ethical Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

Ethical Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies
National Perinatal Association | December 2015

screen-shot-2016-12-06-at-3-06-14-pmProfessor Michele Goodwin at the University of Minnesota and Judy Norsigian have described the “raw and debilitating physical, emotional and spiritual challenges created by deeply personal and life-altering procedures” experienced by some women seeking ART and support the need for additional regulation. In addition to the invasive processes involved in conception, the ethical quandary created by a recommendation for fetal reduction and the emotional toll on women and couples may be profound and is incompletely studied. Professor Goodwin asserts there is a “much needed public discourse that could also become the clarion call for regulation of a field of medicine that has thus far unsuccessfully regulated itself.”

This position paper by the National Perinatal Association addresses the ethical use of assisted reproductive technologies. It emphasizes reducing disparities in care provided to mothers and children and makes helpful recommendations, including: single embryo transfers, counseling from a multi-disciplinary team, informed consent prior to treatment, and access to comprehensive obstetric care during and after treatment.

Read the full document >