Same-sex Couples Push for Adoption Rights in Taiwan After Landmark Case Offers Hope

Clio Yang | ABC News | February 21, 2022

Mr. Tsou and his husband are looking for international surrogacy arrangements because adoption by gay married couples is not legal in Taiwan. However, a couple of exceptions have been granted in the best interest of the child, and more inclusive ART legislation is being reviewed by the government. 

Read the full article here ->

‘Those Who Used Surrogacy Should Lab-Check Their Child’s Genes’

Aastha Atray Banan | Mid-Day | February 6, 2022

India recently passed new Surrogacy and ART Acts, banning commercial surrogacy and germline cell sales, respectively. In this interview, author Pinki Virani acknowledges that the acts will promote a more regulated, less money-oriented fertility industry by eliminating the sale-purchase aspect of sperm and eggs and putting power in the hands of surrogates. On the other hand, Virani believes that there are still risks with IVF and third-party reproduction due to the complexity of sourcing sex cells, fertilization, implantation, and birth. In particular, she urges patients to undergo thorough screening processes to reduce the risk of genetic siblings unknowingly becoming a couple.  

Read the full article here ->

Special Committee on International Surrogacy to be Established

Ailbhe Conneely | RTÉ News | January 21, 2022

Ireland established a special joint Oireachtas committee to discuss and regulate international surrogacy, especially regarding the rights and interest of the children in order to prevent child trafficking. Legislation suggested by the committee will be integrated into the Assisted Human Reproduction Bill.

Read the full article here ->

Assisted Reproduction and Surrogacy Bills Passed by Indian Parliament

Sarah Pritchard | BioNews | December 13, 2021

The Indian Parliament approved legislation to better regulate fertility and surrogacy practices in the country and protect the health of women involved. The Assisted Reproductive Technology (Regulation) Bill 2021 aims to maintain a standard of infrastructure, equipment, and personnel at fertility clinics. The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill 2020 proposes increased health insurance coverage to 36 months, prohibits paid surrogacy, and allows divorced or widowed women to have children through surrogacy. Criticism of the bills highlight the lack of inclusion of single parents and LGBTQ+ communities.

Read the full article here ->

Parliamentary Panel Says ART Not Appropriate For Live-in or Same Sex Couples

Bindu Shajan Perappadan | The Hindu | March 20, 2021

In India, the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Health and Family Welfare issued a report recommending that the 2020 version of the Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) Bill exclude unmarried and same-sex couples from use of ART, arguing that would be in the best interest of the children born through those services. The Committee also suggested that the government make IVF more accessible to poor communities by opening ART facilities at every medical institute and premier hospital. The report notes the urgent need for regulation and monitoring to prevent uncontrolled commercialization of the ART industry in India.

Read the full article here ->

Portland Passes LGBTQ+ Inclusive Fertility Health Coverage for City Employees

Danny Peterson | KOIN 6 News | January 6, 2021

The Portland City Council unanimously passed an ordinance to include single and LGBTQ city employees in their fertility and family planning health benefits. Previous exclusions in coverage leading to high out-of-pocket expenses for fertility treatments, adoption, surrogacy, or fostering had disproportionate effects on marginalized communities. Elected officials expressed excitement about breaking down barriers for city employees who hope to become parents.

Read the full article here ->

Russia’s Civic Chamber Urges Legislative Regulation of Fertility Treatment and Surrogacy

RAPSI | December 7, 2020

According to this article, Russia’s Civic Chamber has developed recommendations on assisted reproductive technologies, based on public hearings over the summer. These proposals will fill current legislative gaps, such as protecting children born through surrogacy and licensing intermediary surrogacy agencies.

Read the full article here ->

Japan Should Update Laws on Assisted Reproduction: Yomiuri Shimbun

The Straits Times | December 7, 2020

This Editorial in the Straits Times asserts that legislation in Japan must keep up with advances in assisted reproductive technology, including regulation to safeguard babies born and to address egg and sperm donation and surrogacy. The Editorial raises issues of ethics, commercialization and eugenics and calls on the application of a supplementary provision of a new special law that would study a range of issues and enact legal measures related to assisted reproduction.

Read the full article here ->

‘Equal Parentage’ Bill Is Signed Into Law by Governor

By Katie Mulvaney | Providence Journal | July 21, 2020

On July 21, the Equal Parentage bill was passed in Rhode Island, giving same-sex couples, unmarried people, and others who have children through assisted reproduction technologies an avenue to establish legal parentage at birth. The bill eliminates the need for non-birth parents to complete “second-parent” adoptions, addresses some aspects of surrogacy arrangements, and provides guidance for children conceived through sperm donation to find information on the donor when they turn 18.

Read the full article >

The Stranded Babies of Kyiv and the Women who Give Birth for Money

By Oksana Grytsenko | The Guardian | June 15, 2020

This article exposes the scale and problematic nature of the surrogacy industry in Ukraine, with the COVID crisis exacerbating conditions even more. The ombudsman for children is now calling for a ban on commercial surrogacy in Ukraine for foreign couples. Without sufficient regulation and protections in place, surrogates in Ukraine are beginning to self-organize on social media, where they share advice and warnings about agencies, and expose increased mistreatment during the pandemic.

Read the full article >