Georgia, We Have a Problem: Surrogacy and Exploitation

Winifred Badaiki | Impact Ethics | March 26, 2021

Many intended parents seek surrogacy services in the Republic of Georgia because prices are among the cheapest globally. Due to Georgia’s poor economic situation, many Georgian women turn to gestational surrogacy to escape poverty or other precarious situations. However, the country’s lack of surrogacy regulation means surrogates have few if any rights, and the industry often exploits the power dynamic between the low-income carriers and middle-class intended parents.

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Georgia Tightens Surrogacy Laws

Civil.ge. | August 28, 2020

Changes to Georgia’s surrogacy laws will require intended parents (only heterosexual couples are recognized) to live in a relationship for a year prior to engaging in surrogacy. The announcement was followed by a media outcry that these policies would prevent single women from using in vitro fertilization. The state responded by stating that the regulations aim to protect the rights of the surrogate, and of surrogate children from risks of infant trafficking, exploitation and other inhumane treatment.

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Parents Struggle to Reach Newborn Surrogates in Georgia

By Pearly Jacob | Eurasianet | May 27, 2020

Georgia is an increasingly popular destination for commercial surrogacy, but COVID-19 travel restrictions have impacted surrogates, babies, and intended parents there as well.  The article reveals that at least 40 babies are stranded in Georgia without parents, 30 of them in Chachava Clinic, one of the oldest maternity hospitals in Georgia. The article also notes that surrogacy is unregulated in Georgia, has no system for recording births, and is only available to heterosexual couples with fertility challenges.

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